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I figured most of you dads would get a kick out of this...


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39 minutes ago, Cal Naughton Jr said:

TikTok is part of what’s wrong with society. Hey everyone, look at me...

In my opinion, you can extend that (more or less) to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and personal YouTube channels. It’s very narcissistic. But, it’s the world we live in today. 

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I frickin’ love TikTok.

Roughly, my feed’s algorithm involves babies, dogs, farms/livestock, fishing, people lip syncing comedy routines, and a grab bag of what’s pervasive on the app (like the longboard ocean spray guy).

Best app on my phone.

13 hours ago, SJSabres Fan said:

I had seen that one. While I identified with some of it, I found it just a lil too ragey for my funny bone taste.

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1 hour ago, inkman said:

Is it wrong for me to be oddly attracted to her?

Ha. Not a'tall. Do yourself a favor (or impose a monkey paw curse on yourself) and browse her profile's content (all of which is pretty similarly themed). There's no denying she is sexy as hell ... in her own peculiar, weird way. Which is always the best way.

Just for example: That smoldering look she gives at the start of The Hustle video? Oh, mama.

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13 hours ago, Zamboni said:

In my opinion, you can extend that (more or less) to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and personal YouTube channels. It’s very narcissistic. But, it’s the world we live in today. 

100%. Social media in general is to blame for the downfall of society. It’s not about being there, it’s about showing everyone that you’re there. I recently deactivated my Facebook because it’s just a toxic place now that the election is “over”. Just so much hate and hostility...

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4 hours ago, Weave said:

You guys are doing social media all wrong.  All that garbage can be weeded out of your feed.

i'm saying: tiktok for me is like watching a form of television. it's bite-sized, no attention span television. but television just the same. the content that people create for that platform is fun. here's another favourite of mine from that site (huge warning for rough language):

 

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This is a form of social media 😎, about the only one I have. My life has gotten significantly better since deleting any other accounts I had back in March. I use What's app to talk to my kiddos in Africa, and then I spend wayyyy too much time on here 😜

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On 11/10/2020 at 6:40 PM, Cal Naughton Jr said:

TikTok is part of what’s wrong with society. Hey everyone, look at me...

I can’t imagine what’s it like to be a boss these days (non-COVID).  When they call a staff meeting, do they have to collect all the cellphones.  Now, if they do it on Zoom, they can see if everybody is paying attention but can’t do much about it if they’re not.

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On 11/12/2020 at 1:52 AM, gilbert11 said:

I can’t imagine what’s it like to be a boss these days (non-COVID).  When they call a staff meeting, do they have to collect all the cellphones.  Now, if they do it on Zoom, they can see if everybody is paying attention but can’t do much about it if they’re not.

I have a Senior Management position with approx 70 engineers in my organization.  Prior to that I directed a department with over 250 engineers.  For my current team, about half fall into the millennial demographic.  I can honestly say that we don’t experience issues with the millennial aged employees being distracted by phones and social media while at work.  It really has not been a problem.  For the most part they are polite, very bright, innovative, and they definitely bring fun into the workforce.  

The biggest differences between them and boomers or Xers that we see are: (1) they don’t like to work overtime unless it’s paid; and (2) they like to change jobs quickly (relative to past  employees) and prefer being broader generalists than to staying in a discipline to become a subject matter expert.   In surveys we find they like/want/need recognition (pay/awards/etc) and job rotations much more than older engineers that tend to fit into a more introverted mold.  Our biggest problem is retaining them because engineers are scare and they can always get a big pay jump somewhere else.  

In an industry that is traditionally salaried and had unwritten expectations to work casual OT to get the job done this has been something we continually address.   The odd thing is I hear about all the uncompensated OT that companies like Google and Amazon demand but for us we cannot seem to get there.  
 

My solution is to try to hire the best, focus on local/regional talent, and keep the pipeline filled to cover the inevitable attrition.   Several have told me that our elimination of a traditional pension plan contributes to the situation.   They clearly understand that higher salaries are directly proportional to bigger future 401k balances.  I can’t  argue with their logic and I teach my 3 kids the same thing.  
 

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Pimlach, your experience with leading millennials in engineering fields mirrors mine.

Then again, I’ve only found distraction to be an issue when someone is not being challenged sufficiently, and there is no age block more affected by that than any other.

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9 minutes ago, Pimlach said:

 

The biggest differences between them and boomers or Xers that we see are: (1) they don’t like to work overtime unless it’s paid; and

In an industry that is traditionally salaried and had unwritten expectations to work casual OT to get the job done this has been something we continually address.   The odd thing is I hear about all the uncompensated OT that companies like Google and Amazon demand but for us we cannot seem to get there. 
 

My wife and I have worked years of unpaid overtime.

Our daughters (early to mid-20s) inherited our work ethic but they are very much strong on this mindset as well and I have found myself unable to argue against their position.

They've learned from our mistakes.

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32 minutes ago, dudacek said:

My wife and I have worked years of unpaid overtime.

Our daughters (early to mid-20s) inherited our work ethic but they are very much strong on this mindset as well and I have found myself unable to argue against their position.

They've learned from our mistakes.

I do think kids today have a much healthier idea of work life balance than we do.

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1 minute ago, Weave said:

I do think kids today have a much healthier idea of work life balance than we do.

Expect you are correct about that.  

Not a bad thing for them. 

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1 hour ago, Pimlach said:

I have a Senior Management position with approx 70 engineers in my organization.  Prior to that I directed a department with over 250 engineers.  For my current team, about half fall into the millennial demographic.  I can honestly say that we don’t experience issues with the millennial aged employees being distracted by phones and social media while at work.  It really has not been a problem.  For the most part they are polite, very bright, innovative, and they definitely bring fun into the workforce.  

The biggest differences between them and boomers or Xers that we see are: (1) they don’t like to work overtime unless it’s paid; and (2) they like to change jobs quickly (relative to past  employees) and prefer being broader generalists than to staying in a discipline to become a subject matter expert.   In surveys we find they like/want/need recognition (pay/awards/etc) and job rotations much more than older engineers that tend to fit into a more introverted mold.  Our biggest problem is retaining them because engineers are scare and they can always get a big pay jump somewhere else.  

In an industry that is traditionally salaried and had unwritten expectations to work casual OT to get the job done this has been something we continually address.   The odd thing is I hear about all the uncompensated OT that companies like Google and Amazon demand but for us we cannot seem to get there.  
 

My solution is to try to hire the best, focus on local/regional talent, and keep the pipeline filled to cover the inevitable attrition.   Several have told me that our elimination of a traditional pension plan contributes to the situation.   They clearly understand that higher salaries are directly proportional to bigger future 401k balances.  I can’t  argue with their logic and I teach my 3 kids the same thing.  
 

 

1 hour ago, Weave said:

Pimlach, your experience with leading millennials in engineering fields mirrors mine.

Then again, I’ve only found distraction to be an issue when someone is not being challenged sufficiently, and there is no age block more affected by that than any other.

I have a similar experience with the Mid Levels I work with, they have their student loans paid off with 2-3 years and will be able to retire before I can. 

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