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OT - Tough Guy: The Bob Probert Story


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Anyone watch this on Amazon Prime? It is a great documentary on one of the best fighters ever in the NHL. This guy was crazier off the ice, than he was on the ice. There was a lot we knew about him and his problems off the ice, but this film sheds a lot more intimate things about his life on and off the ice. A great watch if you have Prime. Definitely more entertaining than a Sabres game right now.

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23 minutes ago, Zamboni said:

No. I don’t have prime. For those that don’t, how about dropping some cliff notes/points of interest. 
Thanks!

There is so much to his story. He was arrested numerous times. He totaled his Monte SS, totaled a Harley from many drunk driving incidents. If it were today, he woulda been jailed for a long time and been banned from the NHL. He got away with so much. He was maced on his front porch in front of his kids because he was so drunk he was wielding knives in the kitchen. His wife had to call the cops. He was a major alcoholic, was doing cocaine, oxy's, mushrooms. He was just spiraling out of control. Went through several rehabs. Played a lot of his games boozed up. Just crazy stuff. Was out on his boat with his family going to lunch when he dies of a massive heart attack. Was a really sad story.

2 minutes ago, inkman said:

Sounds like my kinda guy. I’ll have to give it a peep later 

I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy it.

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4 minutes ago, Claude Balls said:

There is so much to his story. He was arrested numerous times. He totaled his Monte SS, totaled a Harley from many drunk driving incidents. If it were today, he woulda been jailed for a long time and been banned from the NHL. He got away with so much. He was maced on his front porch in front of his kids because he was so drunk he was wielding knives in the kitchen. His wife had to call the cops. He was a major alcoholic, was doing cocaine, oxy's, mushrooms. He was just spiraling out of control. Went through several rehabs. Played a lot of his games boozed up. Just crazy stuff. Was out on his boat with his family going to lunch when he dies of a massive heart attack. Was a really sad story.

I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy it.

One of these things is not like the other. 

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20 minutes ago, Claude Balls said:

There is so much to his story. He was arrested numerous times. He totaled his Monte SS, totaled a Harley from many drunk driving incidents. If it were today, he woulda been jailed for a long time and been banned from the NHL. He got away with so much. He was maced on his front porch in front of his kids because he was so drunk he was wielding knives in the kitchen. His wife had to call the cops. He was a major alcoholic, was doing cocaine, oxy's, mushrooms. He was just spiraling out of control. Went through several rehabs. Played a lot of his games boozed up. Just crazy stuff. Was out on his boat with his family going to lunch when he dies of a massive heart attack. Was a really sad story.

Woah! Thanks. 
Yea, sad is right!

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Terrific documentary. I found it sad that a guy with that much talent (he could put the puck in the net also, he had skills other than the fists) didn't really have anyone looking out for him, or able to reign him in. He went to rehab a few times, but the NHL establishment didn't seem to really care about the man, just what he could bring to the Red Wings and later on the Black Hawks. Way too young at age 41 to pass, but I guess the damage done to his heart with substance abuse finally took its toll. His poor family on the boat with him as well when it happened. Loved watching him play, and saw a young rookie in the Sabres lineup, in a preseason game, make his bones taking on Probert and actually besting him when Probert was a Blackhawk. That Sabre player? Rookie Eric Boulton. Drew a standing ovation from the crowd, myself included. Probert had a beautiful family. An absolute shame. This documentary is so worth your time.

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47 minutes ago, eman said:

Terrific documentary. I found it sad that a guy with that much talent (he could put the puck in the net also, he had skills other than the fists) didn't really have anyone looking out for him, or able to reign him in. He went to rehab a few times, but the NHL establishment didn't seem to really care about the man, just what he could bring to the Red Wings and later on the Black Hawks. Way too young at age 41 to pass, but I guess the damage done to his heart with substance abuse finally took its toll. His poor family on the boat with him as well when it happened. Loved watching him play, and saw a young rookie in the Sabres lineup, in a preseason game, make his bones taking on Probert and actually besting him when Probert was a Blackhawk. That Sabre player? Rookie Eric Boulton. Drew a standing ovation from the crowd, myself included. Probert had a beautiful family. An absolute shame. This documentary is so worth your time.

As you say no one was looking out for him, that is so true. Especially his friends/teammates. He had many years of sobriety after one of his rehab stints. One night he goes out with his buddies and after turning down shot after shot being offered to him, they finally broke him down and he did a shot. After that, he was off to the races again and back into trouble in no time. No one seemed to care he had major demons, other than his family.

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3 hours ago, Claude Balls said:

There is so much to his story. He was arrested numerous times. He totaled his Monte SS, totaled a Harley from many drunk driving incidents. If it were today, he woulda been jailed for a long time and been banned from the NHL. He got away with so much. He was maced on his front porch in front of his kids because he was so drunk he was wielding knives in the kitchen. His wife had to call the cops. He was a major alcoholic, was doing cocaine, oxy's, mushrooms. He was just spiraling out of control. Went through several rehabs. Played a lot of his games boozed up. Just crazy stuff. Was out on his boat with his family going to lunch when he dies of a massive heart attack. Was a really sad story.

I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy it.

But when Kevin Stevens did similar things, he WAS arrested and his life was never the same. 

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1 hour ago, Claude Balls said:

As you say no one was looking out for him, that is so true. Especially his friends/teammates. He had many years of sobriety after one of his rehab stints. One night he goes out with his buddies and after turning down shot after shot being offered to him, they finally broke him down and he did a shot. After that, he was off to the races again and back into trouble in no time. No one seemed to care he had major demons, other than his family.

The era of "manliness".  It wasn't just pro athletes.  Admitting you had a problem was a sign of weakness. Sadly stories like this hit too close to home and I have no professional athletes in my family tree.  The alcohol, the buddies egging on a known alcoholic trying to change his life, oh yeah.. plenty of that. I'll have to queue it up to be watched but not sure I will get through it without getting really really angry.  Sigh.

 

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I found it sad because Probert did so much for his teammates. It even says in the documentary, when Bobby hit the ice, his teammates were suddenly stronger and larger out there. He came to their defence, he battled to get them the puck, he took the front of the net abuse to screen the opposing goaltender and he didn't have bad hands for an enforcer. He scored quite a bit actually. I know back then "manliness" meant never admitting you had a problem  (although with Bobby, it was pretty well known) and knowing he had such a young and beautiful family, that not even a veteran player could sort of take him under his wing and try to steer him in a better direction? If that did happen, it doesn't come up at all in the documentary. Just a sad situation. Even the damn border guards tried to help him out in one instance.

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17 hours ago, Andrew Amerk said:

But when Kevin Stevens did similar things, he WAS arrested and his life was never the same. 

At what stage of Kevin's career did this happen? I know he had a problem but was he near his career's end? The reason I ask is, it became apparent to me in the Probert Documentary, he still had plenty to give, which is why Detroit and later on Chicago would get him to rehab or totally overlook his mistakes. But other than that, they didn't seem to really care about the individual. Just what I took away from the doc anyhow.

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It really is sad to see these guys and the crap they went through fighting to stay in the NHL...I am so glad the "pre-arranged" fight is gone and do enjoy a good spontaneous scrap between two willing combatants. Anyways this is a good watch as well...

 

 

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46 minutes ago, eman said:

I found it sad because Probert did so much for his teammates. It even says in the documentary, when Bobby hit the ice, his teammates were suddenly stronger and larger out there. He came to their defence, he battled to get them the puck, he took the front of the net abuse to screen the opposing goaltender and he didn't have bad hands for an enforcer. He scored quite a bit actually. I know back then "manliness" meant never admitting you had a problem  (although with Bobby, it was pretty well known) and knowing he had such a young and beautiful family, that not even a veteran player could sort of take him under his wing and try to steer him in a better direction? If that did happen, it doesn't come up at all in the documentary. Just a sad situation. Even the damn border guards tried to help him out in one instance.

His third year in the league he score 29 goals, 33 assists and led the league with 398 PIMS. That is impressive.

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4 hours ago, eman said:

At what stage of Kevin's career did this happen? I know he had a problem but was he near his career's end? The reason I ask is, it became apparent to me in the Probert Documentary, he still had plenty to give, which is why Detroit and later on Chicago would get him to rehab or totally overlook his mistakes. But other than that, they didn't seem to really care about the individual. Just what I took away from the doc anyhow.

This is where the stories likely differ. 

I believe Stevens was around 27 and in his prime when he had most of the bones in his face broken. He was probably given pain pills after that, and shortly after that incident he was never really the same. 

I haven’t watched the story on it in awhile, but here it is: 

 

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15 minutes ago, Andrew Amerk said:

This is where the stories likely differ. 

I believe Stevens was around 27 and in his prime when he had most of the bones in his face broken. He was probably given pain pills after that, and shortly after that incident he was never really the same. 

I haven’t watched the story on it in awhile, but here it is: 

 

Another great documentary. Again, an organization just taking what they can from you with no real regard for the individual. You hope things are different nowadays. It does show the ugly, unspoken side of fame and professional sports.

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4 minutes ago, eman said:

Another great documentary. Again, an organization just taking what they can from you with no real regard for the individual. You hope things are different nowadays. It does show the ugly, unspoken side of fame and professional sports.

Yeah, but Mario has circled back around more than once to support Stevens and give him opportunities with the Pens. Very classy of Lemieux. 

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7 hours ago, eman said:

Another great documentary. Again, an organization just taking what they can from you with no real regard for the individual. You hope things are different nowadays. It does show the ugly, unspoken side of fame and professional sports.

No different than the vast majority of employers, really.

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On 2/23/2021 at 6:25 PM, Claude Balls said:

Anyone watch this on Amazon Prime? It is a great documentary on one of the best fighters ever in the NHL. This guy was crazier off the ice, than he was on the ice. There was a lot we knew about him and his problems off the ice, but this film sheds a lot more intimate things about his life on and off the ice. A great watch if you have Prime. Definitely more entertaining than a Sabres game right now.

Is this new or the same documentary that was done about him years ago?

I have seen a documentary about his life; not sure if that is this one or not.

 

18 hours ago, Claude Balls said:

His third year in the league he score 29 goals, 33 assists and led the league with 398 PIMS. That is impressive.

Probie was a good hockey player, and the definitive heavyweight of his era.

 

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18 hours ago, Sabre fan said:

It really is sad to see these guys and the crap they went through fighting to stay in the NHL...I am so glad the "pre-arranged" fight is gone and do enjoy a good spontaneous scrap between two willing combatants. Anyways this is a good watch as well...

 

 

No one put a gun to their heads! 

They did it because they wanted to, and most of them were fine with it.

A few guys who had that role were not suited to it by nature, and it looks its toll on their lives.  They are the ones who give a bad name to the entire situation.

I greatly miss fighting in the game and wish we could go back to the '80s or '90s tomorrow.

NHL hockey is extremely boring now.  Not solely b/c of a lack of fighting; it's a lack of overall competitiveness and intensity. It's totally gone from regular season hockey now.

They still amp it up like in the old days for the playoffs, though, thank God.

 

 

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