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5 minutes ago, I-90 W said:

No I quoted him before he edited his post. I would never knowingly misrepresent someone’s position. 

Lol - all good, man. It just struck me as funny. I had not realized there was an edit.

2 minutes ago, Eleven said:

They'll be fine.

Hmm. I dunno. My thought is that the OCA could establish special parts in each judicial district. Mini-courts that do nothing but mask violations. Or maybe it could be accomplished through some sort of administrative agency?

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4 minutes ago, That Aud Smell said:

Lol - all good, man. It just struck me as funny. I had not realized there was an edit.

Hmm. I dunno. My thought is that the OCA could establish special parts in each judicial district. Mini-courts that do nothing but mask violations. Or maybe it could be accomplished through some sort of administrative agency?

Just have one session (morning or afternoon) per week devoted to it, like they do for L/T.  Maybe they don't do that anymore?  It's been a long time since I was in a town court.  But the idea of Mask Court is fun, too.  Picture Doug Llewellyn standing outside...

Edited by Eleven
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18 hours ago, I-90 W said:

My concern is primarily whether or not there will be a mandated vaccine for all students in NYS public schools. From a pragmatic standpoint, I think that’s the most realistic and immediate concern. 

14 hours ago, That Aud Smell said:

My point there being: The State won’t mandate the vaccination, but you won’t be allowed to send your kid to school without it.

So, yeah. About that.

image.thumb.png.8ae24a7d1694c35c5c8b3f39a2559c22.png

 

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17 minutes ago, I-90 W said:

^ Not surprised at all. I’m not anti vax at all, but this one has been rushed which causes me to feel rather trepidatious.

I don’t disagree with taking time to make sure it’s right and distributed right. Would it feel rushed if the vax was widely distributed in late January? How about in late June?

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2 minutes ago, Zamboni said:

I don’t disagree with taking time to make sure it’s right and distributed right. Would it feel rushed if the vax was widely distributed in late January? How about in late June?

Meh, I’m really not sure. It’s not so much a feeling per say but rather just knowing that it has been fast tracked or whatever you call it.

I really just don’t know. 

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20 minutes ago, I-90 W said:

Meh, I’m really not sure. It’s not so much a feeling per say but rather just knowing that it has been fast tracked or whatever you call it.

I really just don’t know. 

The drug industry is highly regulated. While the vaccine candidates have been fast tracked in the sense of expedited paperwork, red tape, processing, they still need to adhere to all relevant safety and clinical trial standards.  I wouldn’t be worried.

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52 minutes ago, Zamboni said:

I don’t disagree with taking time to make sure it’s right and distributed right. Would it feel rushed if the vax was widely distributed in late January? How about in late June?

There's not going to be enough doses for people who want it in January.  Don't even worry about it.

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51 minutes ago, Eleven said:

There's not going to be enough doses for people who want it in January.  Don't even worry about it.

I think this is right. If you're not a high-priority person - aged, immuno-compromised, front-line worker - you're gonna wait. It seems like spring/early summer 2021 is when non-priority folks can look to get a vaccination. OTOH, if/when other vaccinations come to market, that could speed the process. Then, of course, we could get into the business of which vaccination is best, etc.

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5 hours ago, SwampD said:

How many microns is the water droplet that the virus is floating in?

Honeywell says the 95 stands for being 95% effective and that they protect you from .3 microns or more? Seems like they would work then, no?

https://www.honeywell.com/en-us/newsroom/news/2020/03/n95-masks-explained

Good to see, thanks for this. I know in the hospital we're getting 3M masks I believe, but sadly many of the others I see floating are not of this quality 

5 hours ago, PASabreFan said:

Why are you bothering? Good job though.

Am I not on your ignore yet man, you really should just do it. 

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23 hours ago, Eleven said:

3.  The vaccine has to be stored at -70C and no one has solved that logistical problem yet; 

-80 C freezers are found plentiful within every University hospital system and every blood bank. My lab even owns 3. Standard equipment in research setting or blood processing unit. And for every 3 freezers, there’s usually a running spare in case one goes down (and emergency that happens). Problem solved. I don’t see this as a regular “go to your doctor’s office” type of vaccine. There will likely be centralized distributions within towns/cities. 
 

 

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2 hours ago, kas23 said:

-80 C freezers are found plentiful within every University hospital system and every blood bank. My lab even owns 3. Standard equipment in research setting or blood processing unit. And for every 3 freezers, there’s usually a running spare in case one goes down (and emergency that happens). Problem solved. I don’t see this as a regular “go to your doctor’s office” type of vaccine. There will likely be centralized distributions within towns/cities. 
 

 

True. might cause a few problems in rural areas but since those are at lower risk anyway shouldn't be a problem at all. 

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5 minutes ago, PerreaultForever said:

True. might cause a few problems in rural areas but since those are at lower risk anyway shouldn't be a problem at all. 

As this link demonstrates the rural areas are getting hit hard. And they have the least medical resources to deal with this plague. 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/why-north-and-south-dakota-are-suffering-the-worst-covid-19-epidemics-in-the-us/ar-BB1arLSq

 

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23 minutes ago, BagBoy said:

One more reason to take COVID a little bit more seriously...

https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-mental-illness-int-idUSKBN27P35N

Ummm no, that's hogwash. Most of the mental illness cases are here and now, an inordinate increase in cases as well as mental health inpatient visits and suicide attempts and completions.... All thanks to Covid. This is especially concerning to me in pediatric cases that have reached a paramount number in recent months. 

Maybe these people are being singled out by the lunatics who are so Covid crazy they need mental help because they had the virus. Talk about a serious divide in the country. 

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1 hour ago, Wyldnwoody44 said:

Ummm no, that's hogwash. Most of the mental illness cases are here and now, an inordinate increase in cases as well as mental health inpatient visits and suicide attempts and completions.... All thanks to Covid. This is especially concerning to me in pediatric cases that have reached a paramount number in recent months. 

Maybe these people are being singled out by the lunatics who are so Covid crazy they need mental help because they had the virus. Talk about a serious divide in the country. 

If I'm interpreting you correctly, you are saying that mental health cases in the public at large are increasing ~20% whether individuals are positive for COVID or not?  That sounds reasonable to me.  I can also understand that people with pre-existing mental issues would be much more susceptible to relapses and/or increased symptoms even without any actual COVID exposure.  But a few things stand out to me.  First, this was an Oxford University study.  Obviously Oxford is not some hack university releasing questionable data for some sort of political or social agenda.  Secondly, they mentioned dementia has become a more likely outcome.  I'm no doctor, but isn't dementia a more internally driven degradation of the mind?  I know I'm oversimplifying here but people pre-disposed with dementia are probably going to get it anyway.  So if that % of people suddenly increases, might that not be from external sources (the virus itself)?  People prone to just depression, anxiety or insomnia might be more prone to have elevated levels of their conditions due to current affairs (stress, nerves about the news re:COVID).  My last point is that even if no COVID-related mental issues whatsoever actually result from the virus itself, we just can't ignore the fact that COVID is very adversely impacting people vulnerable to mental health issues.

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7 minutes ago, BagBoy said:

If I'm interpreting you correctly, you are saying that mental health cases in the public at large are increasing ~20% whether individuals are positive for COVID or not?  That sounds reasonable to me.  I can also understand that people with pre-existing mental issues would be much more susceptible to relapses and/or increased symptoms even without any actual COVID exposure.  But a few things stand out to me.  First, this was an Oxford University study.  Obviously Oxford is not some hack university releasing questionable data for some sort of political or social agenda.  Secondly, they mentioned dementia has become a more likely outcome.  I'm no doctor, but isn't dementia a more internally driven degradation of the mind?  I know I'm oversimplifying here but people pre-disposed with dementia are probably going to get it anyway.  People prone to just depression, anxiety or insomnia might be more prone to have elevated levels of their conditions due to external events.  My last point is that even if no COVID-related mental issues whatsoever actually result from the virus itself, we just can't ignore the fact that COVID is very adversely impacting people vulnerable to mental health issues.

The increasing psych that I'm seeing specifically in practice are relating to the socio/socioeconomic ramifications of this all. Many parents can't handle dealing with childcare/work/economic issues, especially with schools not having students and parents having to put in so much extra. The pediatric psych cases have grown exponentially from my own little hospital alone, the separation of growing children, lack of social circles, etc; these are very very difficult during adolescence. 

Dementia is typically genetic, alcohol and drug use and some other disease processes can cause it, prolonged metabolic encephalopathy can cause the brain to essentially not work as well. Prolonged psychiatric issues can also lead to memory loss; I may be unaware, but I'm not sure of any of the coronavirus/influenza or other similar viral families causing early dementia. 

With your last point, Covid is 100% affecting those with mental health issues, but it's the Covid response and surrounding issues that are impacting these people; to this point we're still very very split on it as a country, very sad to see. 

I empathize with those that are affected

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Yeah, I worry about the kids, too.  Initially I just thought that their education would suffer.  But 8 months of abnormality for a kid, with "normalcy" being months if not a year or two away has got to be freaking devastating for a countless number of them regarding being socially effective going forward.  I can't imagine what this thing would have done to me when I was 12 or whatever age back then.  But there still has to be a responsible level of containment in public policy.  Finding the optimal balance is the challenge here (Captain Obvious told me this, so it must be true).  The only way to get there is objectivity, and we as the USA absolutely SUCK at objectivity.

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Everyone I know is miserable. My niece is definitely going to have some PTSD issues from working in her ICU. I'll probably have some from just going to work every day throughout this,… same with my friends not working throughout this.

The question is, and remains, would our psyches and economy have been better off if we just let it ride, and seen mass graves with bulldozers pushing dirt over piles of American bodies. I don't know.

We interviewed a healthcare worker down in El Paso today. He was in Manhattan during the peak there and said it's gettin similar down there. He looked hammered on and looked like he was about to cry several times.

The vaccine can't come fast enough.

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15 hours ago, That Aud Smell said:

Masks are intended to protect other people, not oneself. I need everyone else to wear a mask if I want the protection that simple masks can afford.

Lol - I’m just about done pretending thar I know anything.

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17 hours ago, kas23 said:

-80 C freezers are found plentiful within every University hospital system and every blood bank. My lab even owns 3. Standard equipment in research setting or blood processing unit. And for every 3 freezers, there’s usually a running spare in case one goes down (and emergency that happens). Problem solved. I don’t see this as a regular “go to your doctor’s office” type of vaccine. There will likely be centralized distributions within towns/cities. 
 

 

Do you ever use them to store steaks?

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