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25 minutes ago, MakeSabresGrr8Again said:

Kodak will be changing to produce ingredients for pharmaceuticals on a large scale.

If you don’t live in Rochester you wouldn’t know that Kodak has been a chemical manufacturing site for a long time now, and have had many contracts with the US government. There is an extensive underground complex there and a nuclear reactor was removed from that site a few years ago. Kodak Park is massive and the stories I have from having worked in there on and off for decades would blow your mind.  This really is the stuff they’ve been doing there for years. I haven’t seen the specifics of the deal but there have been many federally promised deals here in Rochester that never seem to materialize. 
 I’m sure it’s not political though?.

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3 minutes ago, Ogre said:

a nuclear reactor was removed from that site a few years ago

We're not supposed to talk about the reactor.

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2 minutes ago, Eleven said:

We're not supposed to talk about the reactor.

I spelled it wrong.

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29 minutes ago, Ogre said:

If you don’t live in Rochester you wouldn’t know that Kodak has been a chemical manufacturing site for a long time now, and have had many contracts with the US government. There is an extensive underground complex there and a nuclear reactor was removed from that site a few years ago. Kodak Park is massive and the stories I have from having worked in there on and off for decades would blow your mind.  This really is the stuff they’ve been doing there for years. I haven’t seen the specifics of the deal but there have been many federally promised deals here in Rochester that never seem to materialize. 
 I’m sure it’s not political though?.

I've heard some stories from a cousin that worked there years ago. I can imagine what I didn't hear.

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11 hours ago, PASabreFan said:

That's awesome. You're going to be around here for a long time.

Are you winning more on the food side or the exercise side?

So, I’ve been an amateur nutritionist/exercise reader for decades. Lots of information I haven’t really used since 90s. If only I did the things I literally read about every day for years upon years I’d be Rambo. 

However, an arm-numbing disc herniation in my neck and an unexpected bout of vertigo in March really shook me. Without going into details, I sulked heavily for a couple weeks after going to the hospital, but then one day I woke up on April 7th and I just told myself I’m going to figure out this health thing. I was 185 and I should be 145 if I’m ~12% body fat. BP was moving up to 135/90... ?
 

So, after decades of reading I decided to pull what I thought was useful to me regarding how I live, how I think, what motivates me, and what was sustainable. 

What I came up with is that 16/8 intermittent fasting was a plan that addressed my issues. I was a late night binger for decades. That had to be the first to go. IF gave me the mental structure and discipline to avoid eating after 7pm. I couldn’t just not eat. I had to be actively be not eating because I was telling myself I had to revamp my relationship with food in a structured way. 

After IF was settled upon then I knew I just couldn’t eat the garbage I was doing before during my eight hours. So, I calculated my maintenance calories, tracked calories using MyFitness Pal, and established a 500 cal/day eating deficit. 1600 was my limit. That seemed enough to eat without starving and being sustainable. 

After that, I took a hard look at my heart health. BP and walking/resting pulse rate. I knew if I continued down my path that was going to be my weak link. So, I decided to address that with walking. Walking is sustainable. I walked 3-4 miles most days of the week until this last month (it got too hot). This had cascading benefits. I built stamina I was losing. I burnt 100 cal/mile. It was hopefully addressing BP. 

So, now I set myself up to eat 500 cal below maintenance a day AND walk off another 300-400. Once I got started, I was losing 1.75 lbs per week like clockwork. My graph from 185 to 161 is a virtual straight line. I measured my weight every morning (I crave feedback and results), along with waist and BP. My 1600 calories forced me to tweak my diet, with mainly eating oatmeal and eggs for breakfast every morning at 11am and to eat salad with my dinner every night. Both sustainable. 
 

I hit my first plateau at 161 and I’ve been fighting through it. I’m at 157.5 now but there is a stick in my spokes somewhere. 160 was my initial goal. Then I thought 150 was attainable. Now I have my sights set at 145 which is where I graduated high school and just at upper end of my healthy BMI range. 

I have no clothes to wear. I’m in the process of buying a couple items in case I have to go somewhere. Problem is I’m hoping this isn’t bottom. We will see. 

So, I picked and chose things that I knew addressed me and weak points and what I thought would be sustainable for me in the future. So far so  good. I miss eating at night, but if I can continue to kick that habit I should be in better shape in the future. 

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I worked at Kodak for 13 years up until 2005. My educational background is in Chemical Engineering. The beginning of my career there was spent maintaining/ upgrading equipment used for making pharmaceutical intermediates for Eli Lilly and Merck. I then did the same thing, only the equipment was used for manufacturing photo-chemicals used in film and paper products. The final part of my time was spent making emulsions and upgrading equipment used to make emulsions for color paper products. Indeed, Kodak has made pharmaceutical raw materials in Rochester, but it has been a very long time since doing it. The reactor systems required to manufacture these types of products have been decommissioned for years, and I sincerely doubt any systems that are on site will be used for the upcoming production. That's good..... it means investment to purchase RM and labor to install the systems required. The unique thing that the Rochester site provides is self-sufficiency in the form of electrical power and water, and a solvent handling/distribution system. These systems will probably all require upgrades. One of the huge challenges for the "new" Kodak will be waste disposal. There used to be an incinerator off Ridge Rd, where the overwhelming majority of waste products would be burned. It no longer operates, and I doubt that the permits required to operate it have been maintained. Pharmaceutical material production requires intensive use of solvents for washing products, and the volume of these waste solvents is large. Without the on-site incinerator, those costs will be very high and without government support, they would be prohibitive. There is no way Kodak could be cost competitive making these products without it. 

All the buildings I ever worked in were above ground, and I am unaware of any nuclear reactors...….

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Every body just ignoring my nuclear reactor post in the randomer thread smh
 

 

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That's interesting...…. They also had a facility where the intentionally "blew-up" equipment, to study the effects of different explosion conditions. Any production requiring large volumes of solvent are obvious fire and explosion safety concerns. We would "donate" glass-lined reactors that were beyond useful life to those guys and they would have fun with them. Our G/L reactors used to mostly come from Pfaudler, another Rochester operation who will hopefully benefit from the Kodak "re-birth". 

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On 7/29/2020 at 5:56 PM, Weave said:

That’s what I get for a short, not fleshed out response in the middle of a work day.  
 

Simple diet and exercise is a well distilled answer, like get a job and work hard is a well distilled answer to fixing poverty.   And that is where politics start.

We don't have to get into a debate, but I don't find the two items comparable.  In one you are in control of your own destiny.  Move more, eat less.  It's as simple as that.  Clearly there are those where it doesn't work, but that's for a good reason, and I don't think it's political.  

Get a job and work hard also means the system isn't stacked against you by taking all the money you are working so hard for and that you keep your job.  It feels like you are trying to say that it's hard to get good food.  I would disagree with that if that's the path you are going down.

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35 minutes ago, LTS said:

We don't have to get into a debate, but I don't find the two items comparable.  In one you are in control of your own destiny.  Move more, eat less.  It's as simple as that.  Clearly there are those where it doesn't work, but that's for a good reason, and I don't think it's political.  

Get a job and work hard also means the system isn't stacked against you by taking all the money you are working so hard for and that you keep your job.  It feels like you are trying to say that it's hard to get good food.  I would disagree with that if that's the path you are going down.

I can currently get two Whoppers for five bucks.

Healthier food is more expensive.

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Just now, SwampD said:

I can currently get two Whoppers for five bucks.

Healthier food is more expensive.

And hard to find if you live in many inner cities.  You can’t find a decent vegetable selection in the crappy little grocery story in the middle of Buffalo.

Like I said, its a distilled answer.

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18 minutes ago, SwampD said:

I can currently get two Whoppers for five bucks.

Healthier food is more expensive.

 

16 minutes ago, Weave said:

And hard to find if you live in many inner cities.  You can’t find a decent vegetable selection in the crappy little grocery story in the middle of Buffalo.

Like I said, its a distilled answer.

And easier to make after a long day, and doesn't take expensive utensils. You don't need a grill, cutting board, knives, pots and pans, seasoning...

Edited by WildCard

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These things are all true, it's certainly not easier, and it does require effort. I think the rub is that in America, sadly, effort is hard to come by, especially as of late..... I mean this on a whole, not in micro segments of populations. 

My takes on this are derived from seeing a ton of the world, we certainly have it very very good here in this country, almost too good some days. We are seen in a certain light here when talking to locals of Asia, Europe, etc; we give off this vibe of overweight, loud, and willing to share our feelings easier than a lot of other cultures, we have a specific way of dress and sadly we love our fast food, even in other countries, this confirmed by the lines of Americans I see at burger King and KFC in capital cities;These are all convos that I've had with people over the years. 

Even when it comes to this whole Covid thing, whether you agree or not agree the effort levels are varying so much. We all know my stance on this isn't super popular, but it's not hard to put some masks in my car and use hand sanitizer, I mean honestly lol. 

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5 hours ago, SwampD said:

I can currently get two Whoppers for five bucks.

Healthier food is more expensive.

It's not the whoppers that result in diabetes and obesity.  It's the super size fries and super size sugary soda.  And no one is forcing anyone to eat that crap.

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1 minute ago, nfreeman said:

It's not the whoppers that result in diabetes and obesity.  It's the super size fries and super size sugary soda.  And no one is forcing anyone to eat that crap.

Distilled answer.

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I read today that a youth camp in Georgia has 240 confirmed cases linked to it from retreat in June.

Ugh.  The beginning of the school year is going to result in a huge surge in cases.

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10 hours ago, Weave said:

I read today that a youth camp in Georgia has 240 confirmed cases linked to it from retreat in June.

Ugh.  The beginning of the school year is going to result in a huge surge in cases.

And thus, my son will be doing his schooling from home this year. That really sucks for him. But I figure I put the family at enough risk everyday, and we don't need to double down on that.

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11 hours ago, nfreeman said:

It's not the whoppers that result in diabetes and obesity.  It's the super size fries and super size sugary soda.  And no one is forcing anyone to eat that crap.

That’s half right, and half tone deaf/divorced from all reality/obtuse.

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11 hours ago, Weave said:

I read today that a youth camp in Georgia has 240 confirmed cases linked to it from retreat in June.

Ugh.  The beginning of the school year is going to result in a huge surge in cases.

Read that article, too.  One quote worth noting:

Quote

With back-to-school fast approaching, it’s important to point out that this was an overnight camp.

“Relatively large cohorts sleeping in the same cabin and engaging in regular singing and cheering likely contributed to transmission,” officials said.

They likely weren't sleeping with masks on and were in a cabin together all night.  Plus, singing and cheering, where you're forcefully breathing out ...

It's concerning, but there were some factors that you hopefully won't see at schools (ours has said that it is unlikely that there will be performing arts in the foreseeable future.)

 

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18 out of 30 Miami Marlins players have tested positive for COVID. 60% of the team. No way this baseball season gets completed. They've played 3 games. Most other teams have played 8 games. This schedule is completely jacked up. It just seems impossible right now.

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12 hours ago, nfreeman said:

It's not the whoppers that result in diabetes and obesity.  It's the super size fries and super size sugary soda.  And no one is forcing anyone to eat that crap.

Until you taste the roll that the whopper is on.  Loaded with sugar.  Also, check out "food desert."  As is said above, plenty of people do not have access to fresh produce, and those who do know that it is much more expensive than a couple of whoppers.

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1 hour ago, Eleven said:

Until you taste the roll that the whopper is on.  Loaded with sugar.  Also, check out "food desert."  As is said above, plenty of people do not have access to fresh produce, and those who do know that it is much more expensive than a couple of whoppers.

This is a huge problem in poorer socioeconomic areas particularly the East Side of Buffalo. 
 

And even at Hospital Cafeterias soup and salad is almost twice as expensive as a burger and fries. 

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20 hours ago, Weave said:

And hard to find if you live in many inner cities.  You can’t find a decent vegetable selection in the crappy little grocery story in the middle of Buffalo.

Like I said, its a distilled answer.

https://www.wkbw.com/news/local-news/buffalo-strong/local-business-delivers-fresh-produce-to-western-new-yorkers

There's an option.  There are public markets. 

Buy some seeds, plant some plants.. grow some food.  Get together with neighbors and start a community garden.  There's plenty of responses to the "inner city" problem.  It's certainly not as prevalent as suburban areas, that's not in question. But to dismiss it as "distilled answer"?  The same could be said of your "distilled response".  

People who WANT to eat healthy can find a way.  Even if that includes walking 5 miles to a store and back or riding a bike 10 miles to a store and back.  Exercise and healthy food in one.  How about that?

I think it's easier to say that people CHOOSE to eat the crappy fast "food" because spending $5 for two whoppers allows me to have more money for other things.  They might need those other things, they might be able to live without them just as they choose to live without the healthy food and exercise at which point they are also choosing the downsides that comes with those choices that will cost them more money in the future.

There are people who need the help, but let's not pretend that it's a majority issue.  Instead let's recognize that people are making choices.

20 hours ago, SwampD said:

I can currently get two Whoppers for five bucks.

Healthier food is more expensive.

More expensive does not mean other food is too expensive.

If you want quality food, make it yourself. You don't get healthy food by eating at a restaurant and you sure as hell aren't going to save money.

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