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Crusader1969

2019 NHL Draft

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14 minutes ago, LGR4GM said:

I always go back and forth on Kaliyev. Offensively he's electric but his game is just kinda hit or miss. There's a lot of questions on consistent effort. 

Agreed. With a late 1st, I look at that NHL caliber shot and I'm taking the chance vs the safer pick.

 

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1 hour ago, jame said:

Agreed. With a late 1st, I look at that NHL caliber shot and I'm taking the chance vs the safer pick.

 

Idk, I am almost tempted to go for a Pelletier or a Tomasino. Also Bobby Brink is currently leading the USHL in ppg and has 17goals in only 21 games. 

Edited by LGR4GM

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1 hour ago, LGR4GM said:

Idk, I am almost tempted to go for a Pelletier or a Tomasino. Also Bobby Brink is currently leading the USHL in ppg and has 17goals in only 21 games. 

Pelletier is super tempting... skills off the charts.

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27 minutes ago, jame said:

Pelletier is super tempting... skills off the charts.

And he works hard and skates good. He's 9th in the Q for ppg and has quite a few goals. 

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Nathan Legare... he's got some skills

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What do people think of  Arthur Kaliyev? 83 points in 53gp in his 2nd OHL season, a real nice jump from 48pts in 68gp in his 1st season. Solid sized sniping left winger

On 2/8/2019 at 10:02 AM, LGR4GM said:

I always go back and forth on Kaliyev. Offensively he's electric but his game is just kinda hit or miss. There's a lot of questions on consistent effort. 

Anything else on him? Saw a mock draft having us taking him. The effort is concerning

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59 minutes ago, WildCard said:

What do people think of  Arthur Kaliyev? 83 points in 53gp in his 2nd OHL season, a real nice jump from 48pts in 68gp in his 1st season. Solid sized sniping left winger

Anything else on him? Saw a mock draft having us taking him. The effort is concerning

He's amazing on my NHL19 HUT team... 🙂  Don't have much more than that.

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On 2/8/2019 at 10:02 AM, LGR4GM said:

I always go back and forth on Kaliyev. Offensively he's electric but his game is just kinda hit or miss. There's a lot of questions on consistent effort. 

You mean Grigorenko-ish?

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47 minutes ago, LTS said:

He's amazing on my NHL19 HUT team... 🙂  Don't have much more than that.

I drafted him on my GM mode team. Turns into a stud there too. 

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looking forward to having 3 first round picks (hopefully) now that the blues have hit form

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34 minutes ago, Sabre1974 said:

looking forward to having 3 first round picks (hopefully) now that the blues have hit form

I kinda want that pick to slide. 2020 is starting to look very much like 2003. 

I want an extra 2020 first. 

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44 minutes ago, LGR4GM said:

Give me the best players...

Which this year, as I’m sure you know, happens to be Americans and Western Canadians. It’s great for USA hockey and the sport in general. I’ll always prefer Americans over Canadians, but I’ll take any ethnicity/nationality that helps us right the ship,

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Here’s the breakdown 4-31

 

4. Peyton Krebs: C, Kootenay Ice, 5-foot-11

In my preliminary ranking, I highlighted the challenges associated with evaluating a player who plays on a team as bad as Kootenay. The Ice have won 11 of 52 games. Their goal differential will soon surpass minus-100. In most cases, high-end skill players can take a noticeable production hit on teams like Kootenay. We see this when they’re moved at the deadline to more-talented teams and their production changes drastically with better linemates. But the more I watch Krebs, the more I’m convinced of his standalone talent. He’s a passer on a team without shooters and he’s still producing at an elite team-relative level. I would like to see him drive the net and use his shot a little more but he’s a player who is active with the puck and keeps his feet moving without it to get open and provide his linemates with options. That’s the kind of player who can be effective with a variety of linemates in a variety of roles. It helps that he might be the second best passer in the class, too.

5. Matthew Boldy: RW/LW, USDP, 6-foot-2

Boldy continues to fly under the radar in this class because he has taken on a role that suits the program’s top two centres’ skill sets by becoming a shooter for both Hughes and Trevor Zegras at different points this season. And while he has the shot to be able to play that role and score, it hides the fact that he is an underrated playmaker. Boldy routinely makes plays to his linemates for scoring chances that aren’t converted because this iteration of the national program just isn’t built for him to be the playmaker, in large part because outside of centre Alex Turcotte (who has only played the back half of the season thus far) and winger Cole Caufield there just aren’t major shot threats. Boldy and Turcotte would complement each other beautifully, though Boldy is playing with Zegras right now. His versatility will translate to the pro game. I don’t see any one skill holding him back now that his skating has improved.

6. Kirby Dach: C, Saskatoon Blades, 6-foot-4

Once Dach decided to use his size and strength to get to the net a little more, the goal scoring ability that always existed below the surface made him more than just a towering pass-first centre who wins the puck back, protects it on the perimeter and make plays to the slot. He’s still a better passer than he is a scorer but it gives his game another dimension. The biggest thing separating Dach from most other 200-pound players is that his weight doesn’t hold back his skating. Dach gets around the ice really efficiently and that, matched with his length, allows him to get to loose pucks and keep plays alive before smaller, faster players can get there.

7. Bowen Byram: LHD, Vancouver Giants, 6-foot-1

There was a point in time when I began to question Byram’s place as the top defenceman in this class. Part of that was driven by how high I am on Cam York’s game but part of it was a byproduct of stagnation I felt developed in his game at the start of the season after an outstanding playoff performance last year. Byram is one of those players whose confidence (something that’s extremely hard to identify in a tangible way but can be seen in his willingness to jump up into the rush) plays a big role in his game. In last year’s playoffs, he looked like a kid who was going to push the pace every time he touched the puck. Early on this season, he looked hesitant — at least relatively speaking. But 2019 Byram looks possessed. He’s borderline unstoppable right now. Since the year turned, Byram has 26 points in 20 games and he has learned that he’s most dynamic when he’s activating to use his shot and threaten as a goal scoring defenceman (something that’s hard to do) and rely on his skating to get back in transition and recover from the odd mistake. Eleven of those 26 points are goals. Watch out now.

8. Alex Turcotte: C, USDP, 5-foot-11

Turcotte has blown me away in a couple of recent viewings and gives the national program three dominant centres when they’re all healthy and in the lineup. He works hard off the puck to get it back, has the talent needed to drive a line when he does, is really strong on the puck and athletic for his size and has really developed a knack around the net as a scorer after growing up primarily as a playmaker. His 1.38 points per game puts him ahead of every U18 forward except Hughes and Zegras — and that speaks to the immediate impact he has had since returning from a 22-game layoff due to a lower-body injury. Turcotte is an exciting two-way player who projects safely as a second-line forward at the pro level due to his tempo and skating. He and Cole Caufield are going to have a lot of fun together at Wisconsin, a program that has missed Trent Frederic and Ryan Wagner this year.

9. Trevor Zegras: C, USDP, 6-foot-0

Zegras is a playmaking centre whose progression has pushed forward at a rate that probably challenges the incline of any other player in this class. My only concerns with his game is that he lacks strength (something that’s rare for national program players who have more time to add muscle than equivalent CHL players), which is noticeable in his indecisiveness as a shooter and his inability to score off the rush when the chances are there. With that said, he has the height to be able to fill out a bit more and the talent to overcome it even if he doesn’t. I wouldn’t expect him to be one-and-done at BU, is all. He may have a slightly longer trajectory than the players ahead of him on this list, even if his skill set matches them, if he wants to be a centre at the pro level. That’s fine, if the team that drafts him has the patience to wait an extra year or two. There’s no denying he has power play upside and a unique ability to lead his linemates with his passes and put pucks into areas for his teammates to capitalize — often through traffic.

10. Cam York: LHD, USDP, 5-foot-11

York is the modern-day defenceman in more ways than one. He’s got everything you like in today’s game: the smooth stride, the calculated decision making, the slick hands which allow him to escape trouble when pressure is there and the passing ability to move the puck up ice or across the offensive zone. He’s also a strong defender who uses that skating and decision making to close gaps, play tight and keep forwards to the perimeter — without having to rely on physicality to do it. But he also has another element of the modern defenceman that’s becoming more common: He lacks a heavy shot and he’s not particularly strong in 50/50 battles. You’ll take the latter because the former skills make him so effective.

11. Cole Caufield: RW, USDP, 5-foot-7

After a slow (at least by his standards) start to the season, the Caufield we’ve seen recently is the Caufield we expected to see out of the gate. He looks like the best pure shooter in the draft when the puck comes to him in the slot and has demonstrated an ability to get to those spots. It’s enough to turn even the biggest doubters into believers of his ability to rise above his stature and become one of the rare undersized success stories in the NHL. Is there an element of doubt cast upon that skill set because he plays with such talented playmaking centres? Maybe a little. Caufield is so net-driven that he’s not a strong playmaker and tunnel-vision can take over. But he’s not just a triggerman either because he can finish in a variety of ways with his speed off the rush or his handling in tight. And when teams play his shot or attempt to outmuscle him, he’ll burn them with a pass or keep his feet moving to prevent the lifts:

12. Alex Newhook: C, Victoria Grizzlies, 5-foot-11

Like Caufield, Newhook has taken a slow start and risen to such a high level that he’s impossible to ignore. The last time I did this list, he’d played to 34 points in 22 games (1.55 points per game). Since, he has played to 57 points in 28 games (2.04 points per game). In Newhook, you get a blindly-fast centre who would be a lot less effective if anyone could catch him. More than that, you also get a kid who is about to be thrust into the perfect storm at Boston College, a program that is desperate for an up-tempo centre. Newhook is going to be given every opportunity to develop and he has all the tools (from the playmaking to the puck skills and the strength that prevents him from being pushed around) for it to pay off.

13. Arthur Kaliyev: LW, Hamilton Bulldogs, 6-foot-2

For much of last season, I doubted Kaliyev’s ability to be more than just a rush shot threat. One of the lessons I’ve learned while scouting young players is that too many evaluators put too much stock in goals, to the detriment of all of the components needed to create them. Players who can score with a big release but lack those other translatable NHL skills tend not to progress relative to their selection. With Kaliyev, though, I now think I may have overcorrected. My belief in his other skills began to turn at the Hlinka Gretzky Cup and he has continued to demonstrate more than just that release ever since. He’s actually an underrated playmaker when teams zone in on the turn-and-shoot move he uses to effortlessly beat goalies. If there’s one thing that’s going to hold him back, it won’t be his overreliance on his shot, it will be his mediocre skating.

14. Vasili Podkolzin: RW, SKA St. Petersburg, 6-foot-1

Podkolzin is one of those kids who can regularly wow you with a play that breaks a game open (though normally it’s a brilliant goal not a high-end play that ends in an assist). And when he’s not doing that he’s still involved in the game because, for lack of a better word, he’s an *****. He hits everything in sight, he’s got one of those smiles that just seems to annoy the opposition and he makes a lot of enemies in the process. But the trouble with his game is how instinctual it is. He just tries to make things happen. Sometimes, when they work out, it lingers with you. When they don’t, he grabs your attention another way. Mix in a constant visible effort and excellent international showings at Hlinka and the World Jr. A Challenge and you have the kind of circumstances that result in Podkolzin landing inside most top fives. My ranking differs because I believe the skills he lacks are the kind that you don’t see, the kind that work ethic can disguise. I don’t love his vision and I don’t love his decision making (he forces a lot of plays, to the detriment of his linemates). Both of those things could hold him back, especially once the defenders get stronger and more talented.

15. Anttoni Honka: RHD, JYP, 5-foot-10

Honka’s size concerns some and he’s older than most in this draft due to his October 2000 birthdate. Both of those things are real. They aren’t enough to push him much lower for me than where he currently sits, though. In a draft that lacks defencemen who can really make plays, Honka routinely does just that. There are some warts to his game (he needs to improve defensively and add strength so that he can win more battles, feel comfortable using his shot and add some explosiveness to a fluid stride) but he’s an excellent cross-seam passer who can quarterback a power play and move the puck up ice quickly and efficiently. Give him a year or two to iron out some of those kinks and his game will translate really well on the smaller ice surface in North America. It doesn’t hurt that he’s arguably the top right-handed D prospect in the draft.

It doesn’t hurt that he’s explosive laterally either:

Nor does it hurt that when the lateral cut isn’t there that he’s comfortable coming straight at opponents:

16. Ryan Suzuki: C, Barrie Colts, 5-foot-11

Fact No. 1: Suzuki has disappointed me — and a lot of evaluators — this year. He sometimes looks too reliant on his linemates and when that happens he is too easily frustrated, which is evidenced in the way he forces things and tries to beat one too many players 1-on-1 off the rush. Fact No. 2: Suzuki is ridiculously talented. There’s a reason he was taken first overall in the OHL draft. That skill set is still evident in spurts on a team that lacks talent (especially after moving Lucas Chiodo to Ottawa). He’s elusive, decent off the puck (both offensively and defensively), makes plays defenders don’t anticipate him making until it’s too late, can burst through his stops and starts to change directions in tight and is a great skater. He’ll need to get a little stronger but he has the frame for it.

17. Pavel Dorofeyev: LW/RW, Stalnye Lisy Magnitogorsk/Metallurg Magnitogorsk, 6-foot-0

Dorofeyev is one of those rare wingers who can dictate and control play like a highly talented centre can. He operates best as the go-to option and primary carrier on his line, rather than as its second-best player. That’s really exciting because it’s not normally true of players who are as skinny and weak on the puck as he is. To date, it has meant that he’s electric in the MHL and not yet all that relevant as a pro player where the skill gap is less pronounced and he hasn’t yet been afforded the chance to play in a role that allows his skill to blossom. There’s star power below the surface, it’s just going to need to be nurtured with the right development program and patience. But whew, he might be fun in the NHL with the right coach someday. I’d take the risk.

18. Nils Hoglander: LW, Rogle BK, 5-foot-9

As the game moves smaller and efforts are made to try to distinguish between diminutive players with enough talent to succeed and those who lack the requisite skill to overcome their size disadvantage, I try to look for a few things. The first is the willingness to take the puck to the slot and the skill to execute on that decision in unique ways without the size disadvantage costing them. Hoglander has that, in large part because of his comfort on his backhand:

It’s a comfort most players his age lack. By going to it so effortlessly, Hoglander is able to go outside-in to get to dangerous spots instead of being forced to the perimeter on his forehand:

The second is the ability to keep up off the rush and change pace. Players who lack speed and strength are too easily defended. Watch the way Hoglander uses a quick burst to create the zone exit here, before executing on a give-and-go-and-give for a primary assist at the other end:

And the third is the little details — the kind you can’t teach or describe:

Goals like that are one thing. It isn’t the ability to pull it off that impresses me most. It’s the confidence to try it, at his age and in a league as strong as the SHL, that does. And more than that, it’s the other little detail you may have missed. Watch back the play above and take note of the way Hoglander settles the pass (which is off the ice when it arrives at him). The little details.

19. Bobby Brink: C/W, Sioux City Musketeers, 5-foot-8

Brink’s play seemed too good to be true. Then he got injured. And by the time he got back, a lot of people expected the combination of the inevitable and that injury to bring him back down to earth. And what did he do? He won USHL Player of the Week in his first week back. I’ve been higher than most on Brink all season and nothing about his play has made me question that. His stride is the only thing standing between him and electric pro upside. If he can work on it, the sky’s the limit. If he can’t, he may struggle with the pace of the next level. A risk worth taking, especially because he’s going the college route at Denver, rather than rushing to pro.

20. Jakob Pelletier: LW, Moncton Wildcats, 5-foot-9

The most talented draft-eligible QMJHL player in this class, one of the most talented players in the QMJHL regardless of age and one of the more puck-gifted forwards in the draft as a whole, Pelletier is a force at the junior hockey level who will likely take time to adjust as a pro but has the talent to be a long-term steal. My biggest worry with his game is that he’s not particularly blow-you-away skilled in any one area — hence the longer term projection. Just because it may take him a while doesn’t mean he’s not a legitimate prospect, though. Pelletier is creative, plays with good though not explosive speed, can handle the puck in transition as the primary carrier on his line and plays well off a variety of linemates.

21. Mikko Kokkonen: LHD, Jukurit, 5-foot-11

I have often written of my issue with the term “hockey IQ” and the way its different meanings to different people confuse a reader, listener or viewer when used without proper detail. To me, hockey IQ is about the player’s ability to process a play before it happens. It’s about a player’s ability to see the second play before the first. Some players, when the puck arrives on their stick, make the first play before their brain recognizes the second. That kind of thought process manifests itself in the only way most hockey players know how. It yells shoot or pass or deke. Some players have the raw skill to stack enough of the first plays on top of one another to still make it to the next level (I see Podkolizin’s instinctual style in that way). But the best players? They use the first play to set up the second play. The deke has a purpose that isn’t just “keep this play alive and don’t get hit.” The shot has a purpose that isn’t just “throw the puck on net.” The pass goes off the wall to its target or finds a moving target rather than a stationary one. Because the brain is able to think ahead, rather than simply react.

Kokkonen is one of those rare defenders with that unique processing ability. It looks like this:

So what happened there? When his forward attacked outward from behind the net, Kokkonen snuck to the high slot. That’s what I’d call a common play. He recognized one thing and then acted on it in the same way most players would. But it’s the touch that’s different. When the TPS forward releases off his man and onto Kokkonen the common play becomes a simple one: Shoot! Instead, Kokkonen decides to receive the pass on his backhand and one-touch it behind his back to set up the second play: A more dangerous shot location than if he had just shovelled it on net. That, in essence, is what Kokkonen is all about. He doesn’t have the talent of a Byram but the game never moves too fast for him.

22. Maxim Cajkovic: RW/LW, Saint John SeaDogs, 5-foot-11

Cajkovic is one of those kids whose outcomes don’t match his inputs. For starters, outside of Acadie-Bathurst and maybe Swift Current and Flint, Saint John is the worst team in the CHL. He is the only exciting talent on his team. That makes his job really difficult — and the same is true for any talented player who doesn’t reach superstar level. Still, when he was named QMJHL rookie of the month for January it was already his second time this season earning the nod. The import draft’s first-overall selection needs just a split second to score or make a play that leads to a goal and he’s doing it virtually alone. Put some players around him and the conversation would have been different. I still see first-round upside.

23. Patrik Puistola: LW, Tappara/LeKi, 6-foot-0

I highlighted Puistola’s unique skill set through video in the preliminary ranking and my opinion hasn’t changed much since then. There’s a case to be made for Puistola as one of the most purely talented wingers in this draft — and without question one of its most underrated. His biggest issue is his strength and, like Podkolzin, how instinctual that skill set is, which makes him more of a scoring threat than a facilitator.

24. Philip Broberg: LHD, AIK, 6-foot-3

Broberg is the defence equivalent of Podkolzin (who I believe is widely overrated) and Puistola (who I believe is widely underrated) where instincts and raw tools meet decision making that leaves a lot to be desired. In Broberg’s case, perceptions put him closer to Podkolzin than Puistola. Is there talent in his game? Absolutely. Is there enough to make him into an Adam Boqvist or an Erik Brannstrom, two kids I’m a strong believer in? I’m not sold there is. He has length, athleticism, strength and confidence working for him. But he makes a lot of mistakes because he doesn’t have the puck skills to be able to make all of the plays he wants — and tries — to make.

25. Victor Soderstrom: RHD, Brynas, 5-foot-11

Unlike Broberg, Soderstrom’s strength is how selective he is about when he picks his spots to activate and attack. Here, it leads to an assist when he joins the rush from one end and uses his shot to create a goal at the other:

But that doesn’t mean he forces it. He made the above play because he knew he had numbers and he knew he was going to get rid of it right away to avoid turning the puck over at the offensive zone blueline. And he did it to provide relief for a winger who had nowhere to go after the entry.

Other times, he’ll just use lateral footwork to cross the offensive zone blueline and make sure he creates a new angle to get that shot on net less dangerously because it’s the right play:

Soderstrom is careful — in the good ways. He thinks before he acts. That shows in his strength as a defender despite his smaller size — and in his more than 16 minutes of average ice time as a teenager in the SHL. He doesn’t have talent that wows you but he projects safely as an NHL defenceman if he can continue to progress like he has this year.

26. Albin Grewe: C/RW, Djurgardens IF, 6-foot-0

Grewe is a wiry player who doesn’t play like a wiry player. He’s a 176-pound winger who comes at you like he’s 200 pounds. When he drops his shoulder, he’s effective in both puck control and physicality. He plays with a nice blend of skill and power. It looks like this:

The issue with Grewe’s game is that while his effort and energy will endear him to coaches, and his power translates well on smaller ice in North America, his offensive upside is akin to a middle-six winger at the next level rather than a potential first-line option.

27. Nikita Alexandrov, C, Charlottetown Islanders, 6-foot-0

Driven in large part by the fact that he hasn’t played in the major international tournaments (and that he plays in the QMJHL after growing up in Germany), Alexandrov has kind of flown under the radar. Slowly, though, after a strong showing at the CHL Top Prospects game, I’m beginning to get more questions from fans and evaluators alike about Alexandrov’s game. The simple answer is that he’s a dynamic, multi-faceted centre who generates a lot of chances (his 112 dangerous shots through his first 50 games of the season ranked 11th in the QMJHL alongside some pretty talented names, including Joe Veleno, Samuel Asselin and Ivan Chehkovich). It took him some time to get settled in North America last season but he has been great dating back to the beginning of 2018 (or the middle of last season). He’ll probably be a mid-round pick and that may have big value.

28. Nicholas Robertson: C/LW, Peterborough Petes, 5-foot-9

NICK ROBERTSON PLAYS HOCKEY IN CAPS LOCK. HE SKATES REALLY FAST. HE HITS REALLY HARD. HE CAN RIP THE CURL-AND-DRAG RELEASE OFF THE RUSH. IF IT DOESN’T GO IN, HE’S FOLLOWING IT TO THE TOP OF THE CREASE. IF THAT DOESN’T WORK, HE’LL CHASE YOU DOWN, HE’LL FIND YOU AND HE’LL KILL YOU. HE’S BASICALLY LIAM NEESON. HE’LL PROBABLY HURT HIMSELF SOMEWHERE ALONG THE WAY BUT HE’LL MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN OR DIE TRYING.

All seriousness: If Robertson’s ridiculous compete level and the way he attacks in waves doesn’t make him a second-line forward, it’ll make him a third-line one.

29. Phillip Tomasino: C, Niagara IceDogs, 6-foot-0

Between Ben Jones, Akil Thomas, Kirill Maximov, Jack Studnicka, Jason Robertson, Ivan Lodnia and draft-eligible teammate Kyen Sopa, there are only so many goals to go around right now in Niagara. That Tomasino, through all the trades, stuck around and continued to outproduce Sopa (who has some decent talent in his own right) speaks volumes of his game. Tomasino’s skating is the first thing that jumps out at you but he’s got high-end hands and the anticipation needed to take advantage of that speed by sliding in and out of holes to make quick plays without having to rely on a mediocre physical game.

30. Raphael Lavoie: C/RW, Halifax Mooseheads, 6-foot-4

Lavoie’s game has grown way too stagnant for me to believe he’s a first-half-of-the-first-round talent. I get why many scouts believe he’s a top-10 guy. The size, decent skating and above-average skill level are tantalizing. But he’s also one of the oldest players in this class, plays on a line with two of the QMJHL’s better forwards and hasn’t become the dominant force he should have become by now. That’s a problem.

31. Nathan Legare, RW, Baie-Comeau Drakkar, 6-foot-0

One of the challenges associated with evaluating teenagers who don’t play pro hockey is distinguishing between how much of their success is driven by skill and how much of it is driven by their size and strength (which is often the case). Legare’s numbers are extremely impressive for his age. He’s outproducing teammate Gabriel Fortier, a worthwhile second-round pick by the Tampa Bay Lightning last year. There are times when he looks unstoppable. But I worry, honestly, about his weight. Legare is extremely heavy for his height (he hovers around 200 pounds) and it slows him down (his skating is a real concern). The end result is that he’s often the third forward on his line into the offensive zone and he relies a bit too much on linemate Ivan Chekhovich to go get him the puck and find him as the trailer. Still, if he can turn some fat into muscle and pick up a stride or two, there’s serious upside in his game.

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Robertson is super young for his draft class. I'm hoping he'll be closer to 5'10" at the combine. Watch him once and you'll appreciate him. 

Robertson is almost exactly 1 year younger than Lavoie

Edited by LGR4GM

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I feel like the secret is out on Peyton Krebs. Let's talk about his team though. Krebs has a little bit of Monahan syndrome going on. Sean Monahan played for a mediocre team his draft year. Monahan had 78 points and his team scored 204 goals that year. He helped or scored roughly 38% of his teams goals. That's pretty good. He also had almost double the points of the next forward on the team (40). 

Krebs plays on a team that right now has 153 goals. He has 61 points and the next player has 45 so he is getting a little help. That said he is in on roughly 40% of his teams goals. That is pretty solid work for a team that isn't good. 

The USDP Team has 196 goals. Their leading points guy is Zegras (because Hughes has played 13 less games). He has 60 points or 31% of his teams production he's helped on. The 2nd point guy on the team is Hughes with 58 points. We also have a 50, 56 and a guy with 34 points in 22 games (Turcotte).  What is my point? My point is that when you see a player contributing to nearly 40% of his teams goals that is something to think about. The USDP team is loaded with talent so you have to be a little careful parsing out the guys that are just riding that tide. Krebs has to create his own tide or sink. 

Sidenote: Alex Turcotte is really good at hockey. He's rocking a 1.55 ppg and that's impressive. Hughes is at 1.93ppg and Zegras is at 1.4ppg. There is just a glut of talent on that team. For perspective, Clayton Keller was at 1.73 and Bellows was at 1.31ppg in their draft year. 

Edited by LGR4GM
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Alex Newhook has taken off as well in the second half of the season and should be available in the Sabres Draft Pick Range. 

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