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Good whisky/whiskey

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I started on Wild Turkey, I'm primarily a bourbon drinker... American Honey or just regular WT mixed with coke is a good place to start.

For the last couple of years I've been trying a bunch of different Scotches, trying to find "my" Scotch. I finally found it. It's bourbon.

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What are your favorites?

I do know that I do not like Scotch. I don't really have any favorite bourbons and I don't really want to learn what is good and what is bad, because then I'll have to pay extra to get the good stuff. As long as it does the intended job, I like it.

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If I ever stray from tequila, it's Dewar's White Label Scotch. But I rarely stray, like you and vodka.

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I do know that I do not like Scotch. I don't really have any favorite bourbons and I don't really want to learn what is good and what is bad, because then I'll have to pay extra to get the good stuff. As long as it does the intended job, I like it.

 

Pffft. I can tell you what's "good" without putting you a dime over $40 for a handle.

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If I ever stray from tequila, it's Dewar's White Label Scotch. But I rarely stray, like you and vodka.

 

Very good tequila can be truly sublime as well. I love a good tequila. It just goes with summer evenings and a patio.

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Very good tequila can be truly sublime as well. I love a good tequila. It just goes with summer evenings and a patio.

 

Cabo Wabo Reposado Tequila is my favorite.

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Pffft. I can tell you what's "good" without putting you a dime over $40 for a handle.

That's still gonna be a problem. My handles are molded plastic and never cost more than $20. ;)

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I would say that Irish whisky is probably the most accessible for a newcomer. Bourbon (mmmmm) is often too sharp, and Scotch has that peat taste that is often off-putting, for someone not used to drinking whisky. Jameson is a little sweeter than Bushmills (which I prefer because it is less sweet) and might be the place to start; Tullamore Dew is sweeter still. (EDIT: note these are not high-end bottles; they are a place to start.)

 

Open it up with a little water or ice, and SIP, don't drink!

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That's still gonna be a problem. My handles are molded plastic and never cost more than $20. ;)

Haha, my roomate drinks "Old Crow" 86 proof. $20 a handle, with an additional $5 rebate. So $15.

 

I would say that Irish whisky is probably the most accessible for a newcomer. Bourbon (mmmmm) is often too sharp, and Scotch has that peat taste that is often off-putting, for someone not used to drinking whisky. Jameson is a little sweeter than Bushmills (which I prefer because it is less sweet) and might be the place to start; Tullamore Dew is sweeter still. (EDIT: note these are not high-end bottles; they are a place to start.)

 

Open it up with a little water or ice, and SIP, don't drink!

I can't do Jameson. First time I tried it, I ended up dumping it. Gave the rest of the bottle away. I threw a party a few weeks ago, and a kid traded me a bottle of Jameson for use of our keg, I was drunk and accepted. I drank that bottle, the first few glasses I found to be delicious, but they seemed to get more and more disgusting as I drank them...

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I find vermouth to be an acquired taste - you might like the whiskey better without it.

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getting into whisky/-ey is a lot of fun -- hard to go wrong, really.

 

The purist rule on scotch is that you drink single malts with just a bit of water (about 10-15% of the drink) and blends with ice.

this is a rule for good reason -- although i got with about a tablespoon of water, and no more.

 

Getting back to the OP and how to go about gettin gintroduced to whisk(e)y.....

 

ETA- And good on you by the way for knowing that there is a difference between whisky and whiskey. :thumbsup:

ton of good feedback here.

 

as i understand it, using or dropping the "e" isn't a function of the style or method of making the drink -- it's just a bit of an idiosyncracy [sic?]. the rule of thumb i was taught was that if the drink's country of origin has an "e" in its name, then it's whiskey (unitEd statEs of america, irEland), whereas if the country has no "e", you're buying whisky (scotland, canada).

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as i understand it, using or dropping the "e" isn't a function of the style or method of making the drink -- it's just a bit of an idiosyncracy [sic?]. the rule of thumb i was taught was that if the drink's country of origin has an "e" in its name, then it's whiskey (unitEd statEs of america, irEland), whereas if the country has no "e", you're buying whisky (scotland, canada).

 

 

Someone hasn't told my favorite brand: http://www.makersmark.com/LegalAge.aspx?Referrer=http%3a%2f%2fwww.makersmark.com%2findex.aspx%3fpgid%3d23

 

I'm good with it spelled either way.

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Thanks to all for the great suggestions and helpful information! I used to drink sweeter mixers with vodka when I was younger, but now not so much. I'm just tired of rotating between vodka and cranberry, martinis, and black russians. I'll always enjoy a good espresso martini (just espresso and vodka, chilled, mmm), but I'm looking to try something new that will be good to sip at and doesn't require mixing. Love all the ideas... you guys have me looking forward to trying some new things! And for the scotch drinkers who like the good stuff, if you find yourself in Baltimore my friend swears by this place:

 

Birds of a Feather Restaurant and Scotch Bar

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getting into whisky/-ey is a lot of fun -- hard to go wrong, really.

 

 

this is a rule for good reason -- although i got with about a tablespoon of water, and no more.

 

 

ton of good feedback here.

 

as i understand it, using or dropping the "e" isn't a function of the style or method of making the drink -- it's just a bit of an idiosyncracy [sic?]. the rule of thumb i was taught was that if the drink's country of origin has an "e" in its name, then it's whiskey (unitEd statEs of america, irEland), whereas if the country has no "e", you're buying whisky (scotland, canada).

 

That's right. Add Japan to the 'whisky' group. Their single malts once beat the Scots in a taste test.

 

Someone hasn't told my favorite brand: http://www.makersmar...spx%3fpgid%3d23

I'm good with it spelled either way.

 

I believe the creator of MM is Scottish which is why they spelled it sans 'e'.

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On the bourbon front - anyone ever have the Evan William 1783? I've heard good things about it - excellent quality for a good price. But haven't seen it in any stores I've been to.

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On the bourbon front - anyone ever have the Evan William 1783? I've heard good things about it - excellent quality for a good price. But haven't seen it in any stores I've been to.

Pretty sure they sell it around here, I might look into it, but it might be pricey for me. I'll let you know either way.

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This is a great topic and I have enjoyed reading every response!

 

I have some experience in this arena, both from being old and from making educational trips to both Ireland and Scotland, where I took courses and visited several distilleries. I tried single malts in both countries that we will never see over here, and even got to taste a couple that were over fifty years old. It is a fascinating subject to learn about, and if you cannot be so lucky as to go to either country personally, be sure and read up on it!

 

I am certainly not a snob about whisk(e)y, and the best advice I can give is to try as many as you can, because no two are the same. I agree that one cube is the only thing that should be added to single malt, as it will cut it just enough as it melts, as by all means SIP, don't shoot.

 

My recommendations for reasonably priced, readily available, mild whiskies to start with include:

Scotch : Glenfiddich or Glenmorangie - not peaty or smokey (which are a taste most work up to)

Irish : Red Breast or Black Bush (by Bushmills)

Bourbon : Maker's Mark or Knob Creek

 

As this is a subjective topic based on individual taste, each of us will have our own favorites and recommendations and nobody is wrong! It is something that is alot of fun to discuss, especially while sampling some of the product, and accompanied by a good cigar!

 

Enjoy!

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This is a great topic and I have enjoyed reading every response!

 

I have some experience in this arena, both from being old and from making educational trips to both Ireland and Scotland, where I took courses and visited several distilleries. I tried single malts in both countries that we will never see over here, and even got to taste a couple that were over fifty years old. It is a fascinating subject to learn about, and if you cannot be so lucky as to go to either country personally, be sure and read up on it!

 

I am certainly not a snob about whisk(e)y, and the best advice I can give is to try as many as you can, because no two are the same. I agree that one cube is the only thing that should be added to single malt, as it will cut it just enough as it melts, as by all means SIP, don't shoot.

 

My recommendations for reasonably priced, readily available, mild whiskies to start with include:

Scotch : Glenfiddich or Glenmorangie - not peaty or smokey (which are a taste most work up to)

Irish : Red Breast or Black Bush (by Bushmills)

Bourbon : Maker's Mark or Knob Creek

 

As this is a subjective topic based on individual taste, each of us will have our own favorites and recommendations and nobody is wrong! It is something that is alot of fun to discuss, especially while sampling some of the product, and accompanied by a good cigar!

 

Enjoy!

Nice synopsis. I remember having some newbie friends over a couple years ago for a tasting. I basically served them Johnnie Walker Red and Black, did drams of each with and without a cube or two just to show them how much it changes. For me, it has always been an afterdinner thing.

 

The first bottle I ever bought was Jameson, remember making coffees and such. Little starchy for me now. About once a year I'll pick up a Jim Beam, Maker's Mark, or a Johnnie for a special occasion around the house. Mother-in law lives on Dewars and soda, when she's not on the top shelf, its King Edwards or White horse. They bought me a subscription to a single malt of the month club one year and the stuff was raw lighter fluid nuclear :sick:

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This is a great topic and I have enjoyed reading every response!

I have some experience in this arena, both from being old and from making educational trips to both Ireland and Scotland, where I took courses and visited several distilleries. I tried single malts in both countries that we will never see over here, and even got to taste a couple that were over fifty years old. It is a fascinating subject to learn about, and if you cannot be so lucky as to go to either country personally, be sure and read up on it!

I am certainly not a snob about whisk(e)y, and the best advice I can give is to try as many as you can, because no two are the same. I agree that one cube is the only thing that should be added to single malt, as it will cut it just enough as it melts, as by all means SIP, don't shoot.

My recommendations for reasonably priced, readily available, mild whiskies to start with include:

Scotch : Glenfiddich or Glenmorangie - not peaty or smokey (which are a taste most work up to)

Irish : Red Breast or Black Bush (by Bushmills)

Bourbon : Maker's Mark or Knob Creek

As this is a subjective topic based on individual taste, each of us will have our own favorites and recommendations and nobody is wrong! It is something that is alot of fun to discuss, especially while sampling some of the product, and accompanied by a good cigar!

Enjoy!

 

 

Thanks for sharing, I'm extremely jealous of your voyage east. Did you happen to tour any of the Islay or Skye distilleries?

 

I really like Glenmorangie. 10 wont break the bank (I think around $40) and it's got a fair amount of heather in the nose. Completely different than the lowland/island malts.

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On the bourbon front - anyone ever have the Evan William 1783? I've heard good things about it - excellent quality for a good price. But haven't seen it in any stores I've been to.

 

Had it before and thought it was very good. Friend of mine works ata liquor store and it is one of his favorites. My personal fav is Woodford Reserve. $45 for a litre so its a bit pricey. Jim Beam is my usual.

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You guys are killing me.....I am about to have 72 hours of open bar with all the Makers and Woodford I want, but I need to be a semi-good boy.

 

Word of advice....don't start with a mint julep. You might as well pour some Robutussin over some ice and suck on a mint sprig. I love manhattans but I won't even touch a julep anymore. MAYBE just one this year for luck, but I can see being turned off quick by it.

 

Drunkies I tell ya.....

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